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Buckling down on first drafts

The idea of finishing the first draft – or any draft, honestly – of your novel can be daunting sometimes.

Writing a novel isn’t ‘easy’. You have to go through a lot to make the best you can – several drafts, maybe some outlining, re-reading and editing, and so forth. When it comes down to really getting started on the first steps you’re taking other than thinking about it to getting it done – which could either be outlining or starting the first draft – it can be hard to get yourself motivated to begin.

I like to start off with a first draft that’s sort of just ‘winging it’. Pouring out the ideas and developments I’ve got in mind without really outlining it or following any sort of map for it – this will serve as that map later on. I won’t get my best work done in a first draft, anyways, and I’m much better at getting things down for the first time, I’ve found, if I’m not constricting myself to the limitations of an outline just yet. I like to get the story down and figure out the little things as I go, let myself and my characters lead the way through the story first, so instead of taking the time to create the outline before even starting the first draft, I like to reserve some time to create my mess of a first draft to get everything down beforehand as quickly and enjoyably as I can before going into the rest of the process.

Lately, I’ve been using events like NaNoWriMo, JuNoWriMo, Camp NaNoWriMo, Script Frenzy, and things of that nature to motivate myself to get the first draft done – I’ve only been participating for a short time, but thus far it’s helped me get down the first draft of a script for part of a graphic novel I’m working on developing the story for and the first draft of the first novel in a series I’ve been trying (and failing) to motivate myself to get a good first draft down for almost three years. Putting aside a month or so to get the first draft done helps me do just what I intend with the first draft – just get everything down, every development and idea I have for it, no matter how horrible it may seem, and not let myself go back and fix things as I go.

My several other attempts to start the first draft for this story didn’t work out because I kept distracting myself with editing and making every last thing perfect, second-guessing myself and stressing over making it perfect. That just doesn’t work for me, though – I need to be able to have fun with a first draft. I need to give myself a sort of playground to mess around with and figure out the nooks and crannies of my story in with my first draft. I use my first drafts of things to explore my imagination and my story, to just put down my ideas and give myself something to work from that isn’t an outline. My first draft is an attempt to let myself go wild and get every idea I have that I can get down on the story, well, down on paper (or in a document).

It helps me figure out what works and what doesn’t, and discover new things and ideas about my story that I hadn’t had before. Only then, after I’ve gotten them down in one big document with me and my ideas poured out onto it, will I go through and write an outline for the story, adding, subtracting, and changing what I need to that I can use for my next draft, one that I’ll take more time and thought for. My outlining and rewriting process are things that I will be writing posts on eventually as I tackle those things with my current projects.

The first draft definitely won’t be perfect, and I need an opportunity to let the story go wild on it’s own, to wing it and explore my ‘playground’ before I go into the rest of the process and take the time to put down a comprehensive outline. While I try to make it the best I can, I also try to make it as enjoyable and close to the ideas I have in my head as I go along with it as possible.

To get my first draft done, I remind myself frequently that it will not be perfect and is my way to get things down and have something to work from – you can’t edit a blank page, but that doesn’t mean that the page you edit has to be perfect – it just means you need to get everything down first. 

How I benefit from ‘Word-sprinting’

Yesterday, I logged about 1,000 more words than my usual daily goal for Camp NaNoWriMo (getting around 3,000 words done in all the day). I didn’t work any extra time on it, and I didn’t really labor over it, either – those are things that I usually end up doing to finish an entry in my novel per day, and sometimes just to hit my day’s word goal. I got these words through wordsprints.

I don’t usually do them – I tend to prefer to stick to just having a good ol’ writing session twice a day to log my daily 2,000. But I’ve been following people who are doing wordsprints for JuNoWriMo, and they seemed like a lot of fun. Yesterday, I wasn’t able to have my first writing session because my 2-year old nephew came over and was hell-bent on watching Thomas the Train, making me play with giant dinosaur toys, and punching me in the face, so I didn’t really have the time to get the writing in. My mother, who was also being forced into the torture of watching the terrifying Thomas the Train and punched in the gut, asked if I wanted to go to Starbucks later, after supper (and after my precious, vicious nephew was back at home), and of course, I took the high opportunity – I seem to write best in a Starbucks. I decided to take a chance and try to do some wordsprints instead of write straight through my Starbucks time.

I was able to do two sprints at Starbucks, and got 1,280 words there in all. Not bad – I got interrupted a few times and still managed to get a pretty good count. When I got home, I did a few more sprints (around three) and logged the rest of my words then (aside from about a hundred outside of it, but that’s not too much compared to the rest that I got down). While I do still want to keep going through with my two writing sessions with my lovie on weekdays, there’s no doubt that when I’m a bit behind on my schedule or having something the next day that might hinder my count a little, I’ll turn to wordsprints.

How I was able to get so many more words so much quicker through sprints I don’t exactly know, but I think it has something to do with the fact that it was narrowing down my time to get some words in, sort of like a race, and that there were other people doing it that I could share my success and problems with in-between sprints. I could talk about how many words I was able to get, how I got interrupted or distracted and by what, and there were the occasional silly prompts for things to put into our work that sprint (the only one I went through with, though, was mentioning a donut. No one can resist that one, though). I had a lot of fun doing the actual wordsprints, and the mini-breaks in-between.

If you’re behind on your word-count or need to write with little reward breaks in-between, I think wordsprints are the way to go. I’m not sure where else people run them, but I’ve found the ones I participate in on twitter (I personally follow the JuNoWriMo account and have been doing sprints from there, but there are people in the hashtag who run them, and during November, there’s an account that runs NaNoWriMo wordsprints, as well). If you’re a little iffy about it, I suggest you at least give it a chance when you have some time on your hands – it may just give you a hand in boosting that word-count.

How has June been going for you all? If you’re participating in Camp NaNoWriMo or JuNoWriMo, what’s your word-count and how have you been managing it?

Camp NaNoWriMo: My Plans and ‘Supplies’

I’ve already mentioned a few times before that I’m going to be participating in Camp NaNoWriMo this June. I’ve never participated in either of the Camp NaNo’s before, and I’ve only participated in November’s NaNo once, which I wound up giving up on. This year will be different – I’ve got time, goals, rewards, and inspiration. I’m building up more and more excitement for Camp NaNoWriMo, and I plan to go through with this. I’m outside now as I write, sitting on my porch and enjoying the fresh air – something I’m sure I’ll be doing during most of my writing sessions during ‘camp’.

My project this year is the same one I tried to go through with last time, and the same I’ve began several unfinished drafts on, even completing one of them. None of them quite had the right spark – and after a while of immersing myself in a different project along with reading up on the craft of writing a lot more, I’ve figured out how to make it work for me much better. The plot’s being twisted around and recreated, new twists have been added, and I’ve gotten heaps of ideas for new character development, something that was missing from the older drafts (despite my absolute love of it – my characters and their relationships as a whole are some of my favourite parts of writing). Instead of sticking to the same old story that I usually try to tell, I’m starting at the same place and allowing myself to branch out to whole different levels of the story. It is, as I mentioned in a previous post, a continuation of an edited version of a short story I posted on here a while ago, The Angels.

This may not be the final draft, but I have a feeling it will be the best version yet – complete with new dimensions to old characters, and a plot much more fun to get into than before. I am 100% sure that when this draft is finished, it’ll take tons of revising and rewriting to make it into really something, but that’s not really the point – you can’t edit a blank page, and if you don’t start with anything, you won’t end with anything either. NaNoWriMo is a tool to get a draft started/finished, not a tool to complete a polished, ready-for-publishing novel, after all. Now, without further ado, my supplies for camp:

  • A few pre-written entries to the novel

I’ve been doing some pre-NaNo writing, to get the ball rolling on my story so that when the event actually begins, I’ll be past the opening and ready to delve into new and exciting dimensions of a story that I’ve been through several times. My project is going to be written in journal entry format, seeing as it’s one of my favourite formats to both read and write in. It’s a blast getting into my character’s head and it’s a way to make the story very personal – it’s not just his story, it’s his thoughts and his emotions weaved into it on a different level. Journal format isn’t right for everyone, but for me, it makes writing the story much more enjoyable, and that’s what matters at this point – I have to enjoy writing it as much as possible to be able to get things down so quickly.

For camp, I’ve decided to try out a software made for journals, called ‘The Journal’. It’s working very nicely for me – it took a little bit to get used to (which was another reason I started doing some pre-NaNo writing, in order to get used to the program) but it’s easy to get in the hang of and use. Since I’m writing in journal entry format, I’ve created a category for my NaNoWriMo novel and am using the journal features that the program was primarily made for. It logs each entry per day (which I will have to change the dates when I save the draft as a whole, but it is useful) and has a little calendar that you can manage and click through to each entry on, even allowing you to add onto days that have already passed or start entries for days that have yet to come, which is also useful for novel-writing in some ways. It saves your entries periodically, and also has a ‘save as’ feature under the export file section where you can save each entry (or even the entire thing) as a different file-type (I go with .rtf’s for the time being while I just save an extra copy of my work).

Dropbox is how I manage to keep all of my files backed up and in-order. I haven’t had it for long, but it’s a great help – if you save a file in the dropbox folder, it will store a copy of it on your account online and on every computer, phone, etc you have connected to your Dropbox account. It also allows for easier sharing of files and folders. This is where I save my extra .rtf copies of my entries for my novel, in it’s own little folder in my Dropbox. Not only is it easy to use, it’s very useful and helps you keep your files on-hand as easily as possible! I suggest it to anyone who wants to keep their files safe and sound and would like to be able to access their files not only from any computer or phone that they have the program on, but anywhere so long as they can get online and into their account.

  • Drinks and snacks

While I’m not much of one for snacks, I love to have a drink while I write. Coffee, sweet tea, green tea, Dr. Pepper, Mr. Pibb, anything I like, I’ll drink it while I write. It helps keep me comfortable and energized, and the occasional snack is great too. As I write this, I’m sipping on some very, very sweet tea, expecting a little bit of supper in an hour, which will be around the end of a pre-writing session. I’ll also probably go to Starbucks every now and then like I did during November to enjoy some of their delicious little snacks and a mocha while I write (this usually helps me get a lot of work done – going out into a different environment specifically to write both gives me some fresh air and a change of setting, along with motivation!).

  • A friend to participate with

This June, both my sweetheart and I will be participating. Having someone else to participate with is actually very exciting for me – especially since we’re going to be sitting down and powering through some writing sessions together. We have our goals set for our days and will both work towards them together until we both reach the minimum word count goal we’ve set, meaning that if one of us has hit that goal but the other hasn’t, both of us keep writing regardless until the other has. Not only does that encourage writing more than our daily goal when it happens, it also has some motivation for the other person to get their draft down faster (again, as NaNo is a tool for getting things down, not getting a polished, publishable draft, getting the story down quick is a goal for most) since the other person will continue to work despite hitting their daily goal. We’ve also decided that after we both hit our goal, we’ll discuss the work we got done today and whatever problems we encountered/things we discovered during the process.

  • Rewards

I guess this kind of ties in with the last two here, but I have worked out a rewards system for the month. Every Sunday, if we’ve hit at least our minimum goal in weekly word counts, we’ll be able to watch a movie together to relax for a little while. The movies are generally less serious ones and moreso ways to relax and get a laugh after a week of hard work. We’ve also both chosen something to get the other when we finish writing these drafts, which might not necessarily be during NaNoWriMo, but still provides incentive to keep writing. Another reward I’m planning on giving myself is being able to read a little bit once I’m finished with my goal for the day.

  • Twitter/this blog

Yes, they’re distractions – but being able to escape and get distracted every now and then is okay, especially when you’re doing a lot of work around the time. Not only will tweeting and blogging document the experience and how it’s going, it allows me to reach out to others who are experiencing/have experienced the same event before. One of the most enjoyable parts of NaNoWriMo is, to me, learning about other people’s points of view on the event and how it’s gone/going for them.

Daily word count goal for weekdays: 2,000 words

Daily word count goal for weekends: 840 words

Are you going to participate in Camp NaNoWriMo this year? If so, what are your goals and “supplies”? And for everyone in general, what have you been working on lately in terms of your writing, and how’s that going?

5 ways blogging may help a writer

Blogging is a fairly popular thing among web-users, that’s a given – tons of us read them and most likely, even more of us write them, from blogs centered all on someone’s personal life to fiction blogs to fandom-dedicated ones and to the place that most of my attention focuses: writing blogs. I read them, and I write one myself. I enjoy it, and it helps me as a writer in more ways than one. Today, I’m going to be giving a list of not only some of the reasons why I blog, but also the reasons I think that it’s worth giving a shot.

Before I begin, however, I will say this: blogging isn’t for everyone, and it might not be ‘your thing’, but I do suggest you give it a little try if you ever have some free time and you actually feel inclined to. It might not be something you enjoy, and that’s perfectly fine. Different things work for different people, after all.

1. The ever-popular ‘writer’s platform’

One of the most popular reasons I see being mentioned in posts about blogging as a writer is to build a writer’s platform. This is, essentially, building an audience through writing your blog. The idea of this is that if you tag your posts accordingly, people interested in the subject of them will come and you’ll get people’s attention. These people are finding out that you and your writing exist, and some amount of them will be interested. By gathering an audience for your blog, you’re gathering a potential audience for your work. I believe that the writer’s platform is something that can be very useful to some, while it’s definitely not required – people have gotten by without it plenty of times before – however, for me, getting people interested (and hopefully helping them in some way while I’m at it) is something that I really want to do. Sure, it’s not going to happen over night, but even getting a small “platform” can be helpful in the end.

2. An outlet, just for you

Sometimes, you might wind up wanting to say something that you can’t convey in your work – you can write a post about it. Your opinions are your own and you can express them, and somewhere, someone else may be interested in reading them. I like to focus most of my posts on my opinions and thoughts on writing – this blog is basically an outlet for my thoughts on things, where I can organize what I think about different topics, but most of the things I post about are centered around the topic of the craft of writing. I don’t often get opportunities to outright express my thoughts *on* writing in my stories, and through posting about it, I can both organize those thoughts and clear my head of those things I want to express to the world a little bit more to focus on my stories. Not only is this blog about writing, it’s about my own thoughts on it.

3. It’s still progress

Just sitting down and beating a post out on the keyboard and from the depths of my mind is still writing, even if it’s not working on my stories, and when I’m not inspired or motivated to work on those, I still need to write. Turning to the blog not only gets me writing and is a form of practicing it, it can get my mind working and get me back into the ‘flow’ of writing when I just don’t feel like working on my projects. It’s getting writing done, even if it’s not on those, and at least it’s doing that – it’s making progress with writing. Not only does it help with “writer’s block”, a little post to get the mind working can serve as a warm-up before getting to work on those serious projects.

4. Helps with tracking your progress

Through writing a blog, you can keep records of your progress in writing, whether it’s on a project or not, if you write about that particular topic. You can basically track how much you’ve gotten done through looking back through the archives on that, which is why I not only suggest blogging about writing, but about what you’ve been getting done in terms of it – looking back at your progress can help you reflect on what you’ve been doing and see just how much you’ve -really- gotten done since a certain point in time.

5. The beauty of your readers

If you tag your posts, you’ll wind up with at least a few people reading your blog eventually. At some point, this means, they’ll most likely comment on your posts. Through communicating with your readers, not only do you get to see someone else’s opinions on your topics, they may end up giving you feedback that could, in the long run, really help you out. Not only are comments fun to read and respond to, they can be helpful, as well.

Overall, blogging is very enjoyable and quite an aid to me in terms of my writing. I definitely think it’s worth trying out for most writers, even if it turns out to not be their ‘thing’ – it’s an experience worth taking a stab at.

If you write or have written a blog that has touched base on your writing/writing in general, why, and did it/does it help you in any way, if so, how? I’d love hearing what everyone has to say!

Aero’s Tips For Writing Action Scenes

(A quickie post from my pretty little lovie, who’s writing you can get a little taste of at his writing blog and his last guest post here.)

Hello, all. I have returned to grace thee with another guest post. This time, I’ll be giving some pointers on writing action scenes.

1) Keep it quick.

Personally, I’m not a fan of slow motion shots, but for those who are, it’s unfortunate that we can’t use them in writing. Since we cant slow it down, out only choice is to speed it up. Action is intense when it has a fast pace. That doesn’t necessarily mean less words, but maybe shorter sentences. It’s best to save long, visual descriptions for either before or after it begins. It would also help to avoid long speeches or conversations, though dots of witty banter  may be more suitable.

2) Give it purpose.

The first thing that comes to mind when I hear ‘action’ is bloody, grotesque, seemingly purposeless, over-the-top, senseless violence probably involving ninjas and impossible aerial maneuvers. Personally, I hate that. It’s the general consensus that action scenes should make sense. They should play a purpose in advancing the plot.  I’m sure no one wants to waste time reading something that has no relevance to the plot. The best action scenes or ones that advance the plot.

3) Septuple-jump gound-shatter kick-smash combo-breaker of doom

Tying into the last one is the matter of realism. Make sure that what happens within the realm of possibility in whichever setting and characters you have. One can do that rather simply, in most cases, by keeping ninjas out of 15th century England or by not allowing a ninety-pound librarian to wield a forty-ton warhammer without any aid, or what have you.

That’s really all I have for now.

(A little note from Cynical/the blog owner!:

Action is something I really see mishandled a lot in fiction, so I really wanted to see if I could get something up that handles that topic – but alas, I’ve not practiced my action scenes quite enough yet and probably won’t too soon, so instead of just asking someone who has some experience with it right off the bat, I decided to ask him to post about it instead.

I’m really curious as to what you guys think about action scenes. What are your opinions on them, and how do you go about them if/when you write them?)

Rewriting and Revising: Different editing species of the same genus

Horrible titling, I know, but it’s better than just ‘Rewriting and Revising’.

Rewriting and revising are often talked about together, I’ve noticed, but really, they’re very different creatures. Yes, they do have things in common at times – you may be working from one of your drafts, you may try to think about more details than you do when getting the first draft down that you tend to pay more attention to while revising, etc – but they are still quite different.

To revise is, to me, to modify something, to go in and correct or condense, to fix up the material which may involve some rewriting, but for the most part, you’re just, well, fixing up the material. Rewriting can be a part of revising, but it really depends on what stage you’re at in the revising and the material you’re working on – the idea of rewriting is different than just revising. To rewrite is to completely write it again – some things about it may come out similar or even the exact same as the original, but essentially, you’re recreating the material and probably altering it quite a bit in rewriting, being it in the word choice or the material aside from that, and you could technically edit it as you do this in some departments depending on what you personally consider revising (when rewriting, I do tend to pay more attention to my word choice and edit the plot as I go).

For me, rewriting is more enjoyable than just plain revising, but at the same time, harder. Changing scenes, ‘killing my darlings’ as it’s so often called, trying to even it out and fix it, and trying to use my editorial mind at the same time as trying to change things that need changing to my liking – they’re things I’ve not gotten used to quite yet. I’m trying to revise and rewrite at the same time, but still give myself the freedom of not trapping myself within what I’ve already got set out, to give myself the freedom of making what happens still what I like, even if I don’t like it as much as what I had originally planned. Revising is something I like to think I’m fairly good at when I feel up to it, to go through and find misspellings, odd word choices, choppy sentences, bad grammar, etc, that’s something I can do when I look over something a few times, sure, but changing the overall material to the degree I do when I tend to rewrite can be a little bit hard for me.

But I have to sit down and do it – I have dreams for these projects that I’m working on, and I have to remember that to achieve what I dream of for these things, I need to sit my ass down and work on them, even if some parts of the process feel a little slow and unenjoyable – to get the finished product that I want, I have to get through the parts that aren’t so fun. If it’s not worth getting through the tough parts of the process, then it really isn’t worth working on at all, is how I see it.

I’m not too sure on whether my rewriting and editing process is normal or not – I will admit that I don’t read posts on that often, which I really should, especially while trying to motivate myself to rewrite and revise my current project, so I don’t know much about the process that other’s use. I complete the material to edit – in this case, it’s my script from Script Frenzy, which is for the first chapter of a graphic novel I am working on. I wrote it out in a large notebook I’ve had for years in pen, so it’s a mess of scribbles and chicken scratch, and I rewrite each scene individually. Each scene has it’s own separate file, which I rewrite the material in and when the scene is done – usually between 3 to 7 pages, I believe – I go back and revise it to make sure I didn’t misspell something or make any mistakes, to fix up the scene, before I move on to rewriting and revising the next.

I like getting each scene edited before working on the next one, and while working on this, I’ve been sending each scene to someone to have them read over it and give me their feedback to ponder and fix up the scene some more if I feel necessary afterwards before I move on to another scene. I usually send every other scene to a different person, so all of the work of reading the entire thing isn’t just on the shoulders of one person. It helps me get the feedback of two different people rather quickly, giving them little bits and pieces of the story without giving them the whole thing, again, which can help see if each scene is engaging enough on it’s own and other bits and bobs of information of that manner.

It helps me to both rewrite and revise at the same time, editing like this. Having a sort of mini-audience, or beta readers, to it while you’re editing seems to help quite a bit, at least for me, especially since the two people I have looking at it are pretty big influences and inspirations for my work as of now. I think I’ll have yet another person look at the completed product as is to get an opinion on the whole story and fix it all up yet again before handing it out to the two current readers to get their final opinions before I buckle down and complete it to work on the other chapters/transfer it to art.

I’m sure my editing process will change over the course of working on this entire series (it will be rather long, if it goes as I’m currently planning), but dipping my toes into this way of editing tells me that the water here is rather comfortable and I may well stay in it for a while.

What are you guys up to? When it comes to editing as a whole, how do you get it done, and what do you think of using beta readers?

Character Creation: Physical Build and Facial Features

In my last post on writing tips, I wrote about creating characters. I gave a lot of tips and general guidelines that I personally use when it comes to making my characters, with the exception of anything on character appearance and design. The reason I left out that bit is because, when it comes to what I think and take into consideration with character appearance, I would’ve wound up writing an entire post within the already large-by-my-standards main post, and since this is taking long enough to post already, it will be broken up into parts as I write them. You can read the original post on character creation here.

This post will be detailing my tips on deciding the build and facial features of a character, reasoning behind them, and my general approach of it.

  • Body shape/build

A character’s build can change the effect an appearance gives over-all. A simple change of a character’s body type could change the way someone interprets them by their appearance at first glance, and is a factor that can be used to make your characters unique to each other. It can show things about their everyday life, such as their eating habits, whether they have physically active hobbies/jobs, and other general parts of their lifestyle. Whether or not you’re going to give your character the build of a body-builder, the exact opposite, or anywhere in between, you should have a reason for it, be it a factor to their health, an exercise routine, an active job or hobby or anything else you can possibly think of that would cause that.

A character’s build is more or less defined by their size, shape, and the reasons why they are those sizes and shapes instead of different ones, and can say a lot about them as a person and their health. Looking at a character’s build, you can assume different things about their eating habits, the amount of exercise they get, whether or not they work out or do something that makes up for that, their general physical health, metabolism, and any other thing that effects weight, body shape, etc, and these are the factors that tend to determine someone’s build. For example, an agile character who relies more on their speed for their hobbies/work/whatever they do would probably be, scaling on the higher ends of the spectrum, closer to being a fairly lithe person, as opposed to someone with obvious, large muscles and a larger build.

Because of these reasons, and the usual sticking to have-a-reason-for-everything-you-can thing I’ve got going on in my head, I suggest thinking about more than just your character’s appearance for this. Think about their lifestyle and the factors that determine their build listed above, since I encourage you to make your character’s appearances make sense when put together with the character aside from their looks. If you’re putting together a character’s appearance before you work on their personality and life, I recommend keeping your character’s appearance in mind and to try to create a sensible character in relation to the appearance.

  • Facial Features

Figuring out unique facial features for a character can be a little hard at first if you aren’t used to deciding on them, but it’s very effective for, at the very least, identifying a character visually, and I find it fun myself. Using facial features, you can make a character’s face unique with more than just blemishes, makeup, and different eye colours. While I’m not against using those things to add to a character’s look, I often see different facial features overlooked, and I suggest using both in moderation.

It’s okay to reference real people for their features – mixing and matching different types of facial features you know or have seen before, fitting them together to create a unique face for the character. Looking at and learning to describe real faces and their features can help you figure out what kind of features give the effects you’re looking to portray in your character’s appearance – there are tons of different types of facial features and degrees to which they’re expressed, and they can give even more different possibilities for the effect and mental image of a character.

You can describe and depict the different features in so many ways, combining different ones can give characters more ways to be different from each other appearance-wise. Even when characters have the same core facial features, putting them to different degrees and adding a little bit of another one can change things completely. I like to look at real people’s facial features and the effect that they have on me – be they celebrities, historical figures, my family, my friends, or random people – and figure out how different combinations would change that, to mix and match them and see what they entail. There are plenty of people in the world, plenty of photographs of them on the internet and in books to look at and observe facial features on and there’s even a handy dandy category on Wikipedia containing what makes up the face and some different types of features.

When it comes to describing faces and their features, you can make things sound different to give off different effects, as well – using different description techniques and words to describe these things, you can make a face sound the way you want even more. You can describe the same features in different ways to give off different effects, and with experimentation, it may even be fun for you, too.

Build and facial features are things that I’ve struggled with even taking time to describe in the past, or give characters different ones unique to each other, and I’m glad I realized this. Whether or not I’m displaying a character visually or describing them in words, these features help bring them to life in a more fluid manner, as well as help keep me from eventually sounding like a broken record in describing all of my characters. One little feature of the face or build can distinguish a character and often helps bring the idea of who they are without an appearance to life. I like to use a combination of physical features and the other things that make a character who they are without it to make them stick out among my others.

Do you like to give your characters distinguishing physical features, or do you prefer to rely more on other things that make them who they are? How do you go about choosing these features for your characters, if you do?